HPC Centers Role in Driving CAE Simulation

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My recent blog posts have focused on performance enhancements to CAE applications and especially the scalability of ISV applications. A key point of this discussion is that it takes team effort to achieve these results. You need production models from the user community, the cooperation of application developers and computational scientists, access to large compute resources, and HPC system expertise. In this blog, I want to highlight the critical role HPC centers play in providing resources and expertise to improve the performance and effectiveness of CAE simulation for manufacturing companies. Leading HPC Centers Several of the largest HPC systems in the world are located at national HPC research centers. These centers are often … [Read more...]

University of Chicago Researchers Make Strides in Genome Sequencing

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When Charles Darwin explored the Galapagos Islands and developed his theory of natural selection, he did so with the help of the H.M.S. Beagle.  The University of Chicago is building on his pioneering work using a supercomputer and storage provided by Cray, also called the Beagle. Darwin's ship gained historic status not because it was particularly unique or special, but because it was the vehicle that carried him to the locations where he completed research that redefined the way we look at evolutionary theory. The Beagle became famous because it was a tool that enabled Darwin to do his work. Theories are essential, but tools are the means by which researchers test their hypotheses and make new discoveries. Today, high performance … [Read more...]

What’s in a (Supercomputer) Name?

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Think “discovery” and you can see why NERSC, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, names their supercomputers after famous scientists and inventors. Operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and serving the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, NERSC has a long history with high-end Cray supercomputers and using them to drive scientific discovery. Their latest Cray machine “Edison”, a Cray® XC30™ supercomputer named after Thomas Edison, has been up and running for much of 2013 with a formal dedication ceremony held last week at Berkeley Lab in California. Supercomputer predecessors at NERSC include “Hopper”, a Cray® XE6™ named after innovating computer scientist Grace Hopper, and “Franklin”, a Cray® XT4™, … [Read more...]

When Applications Go Exascale — The CRESTA Project

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Seymour Cray, the pioneer of supercomputing, famously asked if you would rather plough a field with two strong oxen or 1024 chickens. The question has since been answered for us: power restrictions have driven CPU manufacturers away from "oxen" (powerful single-core devices) towards multi- and many-core "chickens." An exascale supercomputer will take this a leap further, connecting tens of thousands of many-core nodes, leaving application programmers with the challenge of efficiently harnessing the computing power of tens of millions of threads. This challenge is not just for the applications themselves, but everything underneath — from the operating and runtime systems, through the communication and scientific libraries to the compilers … [Read more...]

Cray Supercomputers Powering Scientific Research in Chemistry and Life Sciences

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In recent months, several chemistry and life sciences organizations have turned to Cray supercomputers to power their scientific research. Among them we welcome Duke University, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Université Laval in Canada, S.N. Bose in India, and the PDC Center for High-Performance Computing at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, as well as a number of leading pharmaceutical companies and biotechs. These organizations are doing groundbreaking work, and providing them with Cray supercomputers is representative of our growing presence in this vitally important segment. Chemistry and life sciences researchers are certainly no strangers to HPC. In fact, as part of the 2013 HPCwire Readers’ … [Read more...]