Top 5 Blog Posts From 2015

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Happy New Year! Check out some of the top blog posts from 2015: Why Do Better Forecasts Matter? Meteorologists have been striving to increase the accuracy of their work since the first weather forecasts were issued in the mid-19th century by pioneers such as Robert FitzRoy. In the 1950s and 1960s, the development of computers and observational technologies enabled forecast generation using the numerical weather prediction theories of Vilhelm Bjerknes and Lewis Fry Richardson. Today the numerical models that support our weather and climate forecasts are true “grand challenge” problems, requiring on the order of 10,000 billion (1016) mathematical operations and the exchange of 150 billion (1.5 x 1014) bytes of information to generate a ... [ Read More ]

[Video] Innovative HPC Models Give Oil and Gas Companies an Edge

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  As worldwide demand for energy continues to rise, the oil industry is working to satisfy demand for the hydrocarbon part of that equation. High performance computing is becoming critical to companies that are seeking new sources of hydrocarbons and trying to maximize existing reserves. At Cray, we’ve been working hard to stay ahead of oil and gas companies’ needs, and our efforts over the past few years have made our solutions an excellent match for them. Understanding the HPC problems facing oil and gas organizations Traditionally, efforts to improve seismic processing throughput have come from a match between the availability of newer CPUs featuring faster clock speeds, and new algorithms designed to take advantage of ... [ Read More ]

The Increase in Processing Demands of Seismic Workloads Continues

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I always enjoy working with our oil and gas customers.  Like many of our research and scientific customers, their computational problems are challenging, difficult to solve and directly impact their business. Cray works closely with these customers to advance full-waveform inversion (FWI), reverse time migration (RTM) and other seismic workloads. Substantial challenges loom for this sector, as problem sizes, resolution requirements and business pressures to reduce computing costs all continue to increase. The historical answers to seismic computing challenges have included raw improvements in hardware subsystems; however, we are at a point where a number of conventional performance indicators are declining: Single core/thread ... [ Read More ]

RTM: Essential Imaging for the Oil and Gas Sector

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Reverse time migration (RTM) modeling is a critical component in the seismic processing workflow of oil and gas exploration. RTM imaging enables more accurate imaging in areas of complex structures and velocities by gathering a two-way acoustic image of seismic data in place of a one-way image. As this definition implies, it means creating and analyzing much more data with every seismic model, something that can be incredibly daunting — traditional simulations are already complex and require significant resources. RTM comes in many flavors and is rapidly evolving. Its growth is driving increased geophysical processing requirements: vertical transverse isotropy, tilted transversely isotropic media, least squares/residual shot RTM (aka ... [ Read More ]

Exascale Computing for Seismic Exploration

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The exascale race — toward machines capable of executing 1 quintillion (1018) operations per second — is well under way. The U.S., Japan, China and Europe have all established programs to enable exascale capabilities by around 2020. In the U.S., leading the charge toward significant HPC milestones usually falls to the Department of Energy (DOE): Both its Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration have significant interest in and benefit from ever-increasing levels of modeling, simulation and data-processing capabilities for a variety of applications. Both can leverage critical resources (facilities and people), institutional expertise and deep know-how, if not intellectual property, in this pursuit. Not all ... [ Read More ]